DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2016/B53/S22.134

THE MEDIATING ROLE OF THE ROMANIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH BETWEEN THE ECUMENICAL PATRIARCHATE AND THE BULGARIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH IN ITS FIGHT FOR CANONICITY DURING THE SCHISM BETWEEN THE YEARS 1870-1945.

M.Vlad
Wednesday 7 September 2016 by Libadmin2016

References: 16th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM 2016, www.sgem.org, SGEM2016 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-67-4 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 28 - July 6, 2016, Book5 Vol. 3, 1039-1046 pp

ABSTRACT
In 1872, an ecclesiastical schism took place between the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople and Bulgarian Churches that lasted until the end of the Second World War. From the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Greeks, the Serbs and the Romanians gradually liberated themselves from the Turkish yoke. At the same time the independent Churches of Free Greece, Serbia and the Romanian principalities arose. Now by the 1870s the Bulgarians were the only Orthodox nation in the Balkans that had not achieved some measure of political independence through revolution. By the same token, however, they were the only nation that had not been divided by revolution. Of the Balkan Christian nations in 1871, only the Bulgarians had no independent State or stateless. Almost all Bulgarians were all living within the borders of one State - the Ottoman Empire. Parallel to the movement for political independence was a movement for ecclesiastical independence. On 1867 the Constantinopolitan Patriarch Gregory VI proposed a project for the creation of a separate Bulgarian exarchate, but no meeting of minds was achieved on this project. On May 11, 1872, after the Gospel during the Liturgy, which was celebrated in Constantinople by the exarch, together with the other Bulgarian bishops and many clergy, an act signed by the Council of seven Bulgarian bishops was proclaimed, the Bulgarian Church was independent. On September 16, in its third session, the Constantinopolitan Council confirmed the decision according to which all the Bulgarian hierarchs with their clergy and laity were declared schismatics, and the whole of the Bulgarian Church was declared schismatic. Due to of ethnic identity, Archdiocese of Athens condemned irrevocably Bulgarian Church; other churches have proceeded with caution. Churches: Romanian, Russian and Serbian although, looking with sympathy Bulgarian cause, point of view formal-canonical, could not fail to comply with the decision of the Synod in Constantinople, an independent initiative being equivalent to unlawful interference in the internal life of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. Therefore, the fate of the Bulgarian Church remained for decades, uncertain. Romanians proved to be every time, those closest supporters of the Bulgarian cause. If the political and cultural Romanian state was the one who leaned more on addressing the Bulgarian people in the plane of spiritual life, the Romanian Orthodox Church was, throughout the Bulgarian - Constantinople ecclesiastical conflict, who supported the wishes of his sister south of the Danube. Precedents existed until then, but not the magnitude of the nineteenth century. For example, taking of typographic activity, now they were printed in the Romanian Principalities, the main religious books and intended to illuminate the people. A more eloquent proof and Romanian-Bulgarian ties, during the period Exarchate, is the alternative gift - along with the Serbian Church - the Holy and Great Myrrh, between 1923 and 1945 (until then, it had made Moscow).

Keywords: Canonicity, Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Romanian, Schism, Ecumenical Patriarchate.