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INCREASED LEVELS OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN BACTERIA FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTE DISPOSAL SITES

Sedlakova-Kadukova, J.; Timkova, I.; Malinicova, L.; Kvasnova, S.; Pristas, P.
Abstract:
Environmental pollution represents one of the serious problems of our society. During anthropogenic activities (mining and ore processing, metal processing industry) toxic compounds and heavy metals are introduced into our environment. Their accumulation in ecosystems creates a huge environmental load and it threats environment and human health. Another emerging environmental threat is a genetic pollution. Genetic pollution is an uncontrolled gene (usually antibiotic resistance gene) flow into populations of non-target bacteria. Slovakia is a country with a long history of mining activities and well-developed metal processing industry. Consequently, extensive areas of Slovakia are contaminated by increased levels of heavy metals. In our experiments bacterial population from several metal processing industrial waste disposal sites (mine tailing Slovinky in the north-eastern part of Slovakia, nickel sludge disposal site near Sered in western part of Slovakia, Hacava-Hnusta and Hodrusa-Hamre in central part of Slovakia) were analysed by cultivation approach. Selected isolates were tested for heavy metal tolerance and resistance to selected antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin). As expected, increased levels of heavy metal resistance were detected in tested isolates. Surprisingly, unexpectedly high levels of antibiotic resistance (predominantly to chloramphenicol) were detected in these isolates and statistical analyses confirmed correlation between selected antibiotic and heavy metal resistance. Our results indicate that heavy metals contribute to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance and industrial waste disposal sites could represent a hot-spot for the antibiotic resistance spreading.
SGEM Research areas:
Year:
2018
Type of Publication:
In Proceedings
Keywords:
antibiotic resistance; heavy metals; gene transfer; genetic pollution
Volume:
18
SGEM Book title:
18th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM2018
Book number:
6.4
SGEM Series:
International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference-SGEM
Pages:
195-202
Publisher address:
51 Alexander Malinov blvd, Sofia, 1712, Bulgaria
SGEM supporters:
Bulgarian Acad Sci; Acad Sci Czech Republ; Latvian Acad Sci; Polish Acad Sci; Russian Acad Sci; Serbian Acad Sci & Arts; Slovak Acad Sci; Natl Acad Sci Ukraine; Natl Acad Sci Armenia; Sci Council Japan; World Acad Sci; European Acad Sci, Arts & Letters; Ac
Period:
3 – 6 December, 2018
ISBN:
978-619-7408-71-3
ISSN:
1314-2704
Conference:
18th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference SGEM2018, 3 – 6 December, 2018
DOI:
10.5593/sgem2018V/6.4/S08.025
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