DBPapers
DOI: 10.5593/sgem2012/s01.v1044

THE WARM PHASES OF THE CLIMATIC CYCLE OF MINI-GLACIATIONS (WITH ABOUT 1,000 YEARS PERIOD) IN ALLEGORICAL MIRRORING: THE MYTH OF PHOENIX BIRD

M. TICLEANU, STAVROS, P. PAPAMARINOPOULOS
Wednesday 1 August 2012 by Libadmin2012

References: 12th International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference, www.sgem.org, SGEM2012 Conference Proceedings/ ISSN 1314-2704, June 17-23, 2012, Vol. 1, 369 - 376 pp

ABSTRACT

This preliminary study highlights very clear that some particularities of the warm phases
of the Holocene climatic cycle with about 1,000 years period (strong solar explosions
followed by spectacular aurora borealis) are very well reflected by the concrete
numerical data related to the myth of Phoenix Bird. In particular this mythical “bird”
corresponds to the some especial aurora borealis (or austral) very rare observed at low
latitudes, due to some strong solar explosions associated to the warm phases of the cycle
of mini-glaciations. So, the data related to this myth reflects, indirectly, the important
solar explosions connected to the warm phases placed between the climatic oscillations
Piora II (Rootmos II) and Löbben (the Sesostris moment at about 1990 -1987 BC),
between climatic oscillations Löbben and Göschenen I (the pre-Hesiode moment at
about 1033 -1030 BC) and during the warm phase called “Roman Era” (at 34 -36 AD).
Also all these data may be in connection with the similar information related to the last
warm phase of this cycle (the Actual Climatic Optimum or the “Global Warming”),
already marked by aurora borealis observed at low latitudes (Honolulu, 1859 and
Singapore, 1909). It is also very clear that the possible strong solar explosion connected
with the reign of Amasis Pharaoh (temporally placed at 529 - 526 BC) is an extrasequential
moment in relation to the climatic cycle of mini-glaciations, having in this
case a different origin than this climatic cycle, due evidently to the periodical variations
of the solar activity. It is important to mark also that the period of time noted by
Hesiode (957 years), regarding the lifetime of the Phoenix Bird corresponds to the time
interval between the moment Sesostris ( 1990 – 1987 BC) and the pre-Hesiode
moment ( 1033 – 1030 BC), while the big period of time noted by Tacitus (1,461
years) corresponds to the time interval between the Sesostris moment and the extrasequential
moment Amasis ( 529 -526 BC).

Keywords: solar explosions, aurora borealis, low latitudes, global warming, Sesostris,
Amasis, Hesiode, Tacitus.

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