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INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS ON THE GROUNDWATER QUALITY IN THE EUROPEAN PART OF RUSSIA (ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE TATARSTAN REPUBLIC)

R. K. Musin, E. A. Korolev, K. E. Zotina
Wednesday 19 December 2018 by Libadmin2018

ABSTRACT

The widespread use of fertilizers and pesticides impairs the state of the environment. Identifying the nature of the influence of fertilizers and pesticides on natural waters and identifying the extent of this influence is relevant today. The article discusses the influence of mineral and organic fertilizers on the qualitative characteristics of groundwater (waters of the first aquifer from the surface) in the Predvolzhsky region of the Republic of Tatarstan. Hydrogeochemical and agrochemical data help assess this effect. These data were collected from 24 catchment areas in the Predvolzhsky region. The distribution of groundwater is determined by the natural conditions of this region. The composition of water is predominantly hydrocarbonate calcium and magnesium-calcium. Their mineralization rarely exceeds 0.5 g/l, and the total hardness is 7 mmol/l. In the period from 1976 to 2004, 12 million tons of organic fertilizers and 0.24 million tons of the active substance of mineral fertilizers were sown on the lands under cultivation in the Predvolzhsky region. They were used with intensity: for organic fertilizers - 0.6-1.0 t/hectare per year, and for mineral fertilizers - 11.8–20 kg/hectare per year. Comprehensive data processing revealed that moderate fertilization currently does not cause water quality impairment.

Keywords: mineral and organic fertilizers, groundwater, springs, groundwater pollution


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